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Kievskaya psaltyr'. 2 Volumes.
Vol. 1: G. Vzdornov, Issledovanie Kievskoi psaltiri. Vol. 2. Kievskaya psaltyr' 1397 goda iz Gosudarstvennoi Publichnoi biblioteki imeni M.E. Saltykova-Shchedrina v Leningrade "Iskusstvo", Moskva, 1978; 171, 229, 4pp., with many plates, bound with d/w, folio, very good edition, splendid work 
£ 95.00
Accompanied by The Kiev Psalter of 1397: an analysis. by Nadezhda Toranova. MKA Erin-Lee McGuire. which also includes some coloured illustrations from the facsimile edition. 16 A-4 pages, loose, printed single-sided. 

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The Kiev Psalter [1], also called the Spyridon Psalter is unique. It is the only preserved Slavonic manuscript of its kind dating to the period before the fifteenth century. It is also anachronistic, produced in 1397 but illustrated in a style typical of the eleventh century. A marginal Psalter [2], it must have been a very valuable treasure in the medieval period as << the book of Psalms is of all books, the mother.>> [3] The Kiev Psalter has a straightforward past, with no real mysteries, and yet the manuscript itself is a mystery. Why were its illustrations copied from an earlier manuscript? Which manuscript served as the model? Why was it produced in Kiev, when all indications suggest that the scribe, artist and patron came from Moscow? Answers to these questions have been proposed, but they are theories only. Short of time travel, the answers will likely remain theories.  The Kiev Psalter is a luxury volume, containing over 300 colourful miniatures throughout its 229 leaves. A large book (30 cm by 24.5 cm), it has wide margins: 3 cm on the top; 6 cm on the sides; and 7 cm on the bottom. These margins are maintained throughout the manuscript and are generally filled with images and the occasional added commentary or text. The composition of the images varies from single figures to complex narratives filling the margins entirely. There is one instance where a page was reserved for an image only: the frontispiece, portraying David composing the Psalms. Another full-page image was added later, to the other side of the same folio. The rest of the images serve in conjunction with the text and are meant to be read at the same time. The text of the manuscript consists of the psalms (folios 2-205), the Odes (205-227) and a few brief liturgical texts and prayers that were added later (228-9). [4] All of the text written in 1397 was written in a liturgical uncial script with large, illuminated initials used frequently. The original binding was replaced in the nineteenth century with green velvet panels. Unfortunately, the person who rebound the manuscript appears to have cropped the pages, as the damaged commentary on folio 197 recto would seem to indicate. In addition, folios 145 and 154-6 were replaced in the seventeenth century with paper pages containing no images. As of 1978, the manuscript was being kept unbound in the Leningrad Public Library.....

the full text of this essay by Nadezhda Toranova is also available as a PDF

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